Equerry Horsefeed

Many factors can influence your horse’s ability when competing, including his genetic potential and fitness. However, the correct diet is very important in order to meet his nutrient requirements for the Riding Club activities he is doing.

One of the most difficult challenges in feeding horses is balancing the need for sufficient fibre whilst also providing enough energy for his workload. Fibre is fermented in the hindgut by microbes to produce a continual supply of energy. All forage (i.e. hay, haylage and/or grazing) fed should be of good quality, both in terms of its nutritional value and hygiene. Most horses should receive between 1.5- 2% of their bodyweight in fibre. A diet of ad-lib forage and little and often feeding of a low sugar and starch feed are recommended in most cases.

If your horse is a good-doer, then feeding a high fibre, low-calorie feed such as Equerry High Fibre Cubes is advisable. Equerry High Fibre Cubes are ‘Non-Heating’, cereal-grain-free, low in sugar and starch and will provide all his basic vitamins and minerals for light to medium work.

If your horse is in medium to hard work, he will probably need more calories to support his condition and provide more energy. There will also be an increased demand for protein. Equerry Conditioning Mash or Equerry Conditioning Cubes are the ideal choice for him.

Protein is a very important nutrient required in the horse’s diet. It is essential for muscle development and damage repair along with promoting topline and for losses in body fluids. Protein is made up of chains of amino acids, of which ten are essential for the horse and about ten are non-essential. The essential amino acids must be provided in the diet as the horse can only synthesise the non-essential himself. Equerry Conditioning Mash/Equerry Conditioning Cubes have been formulated to provide good levels of essential amino acids, including lysine and methionine. These amino acids, plus the added oil and linseed provided in Equerry Conditioning Mash/Equerry Conditioning Cubes, also help to promote a glossy, shiny skin and coat.

The increased need for macro-nutrients (protein and energy) is accompanied by a higher demand for micronutrients (vitamins and minerals). Vitamins and minerals are responsible for energy metabolism, good bone strength and hoof quality. Equerry Conditioning Mash/Equerry Conditioning Cubes contain raised levels of Vitamin E and Selenium which are important antioxidants that play a large role in the muscle metabolism of horses with strenuous workloads. They help to neutralise the increased free radical production which is associated with higher levels of exercise.

Equerry Conditioning Mash/Equerry Conditioning Cubes also contain added yeast. This helps to promote overall digestive health and therefore, will enable your horse to digest his hard feed and forage more efficiently. The demands placed on your horse can cause stress in his work and travel and there is now a great deal of evidence to show that yeast can benefit stressed horses.

Equerry Conditioning Mash and Equerry Conditioning Cubes are complete feeds and when fed at the recommended rate will provide your horse with the correct levels of vitamins, minerals and trace-elements. As a guide, a horse weighing 500kg would need 2.5-3kg Equerry Conditioning Mash/Equerry Conditioning Cubes daily. This should be divided into at least 2 small meals, fed at least 4 hours apart.

New Equerry Horse Feeds British Riding Clubs Competition at Bolesworth International

The Equerry Bolesworth International Horse Show has added an exciting new event for British Riding Club competitors at the prestigious venue.

Taking place on Saturday, June 16 at 12:40pm in conjunction with British Riding Clubs, there will be an 80cm and 90cm class for British Riding Club members.

There will be four competitions including a Team and Individual Competition at 80cm, and a Team and Individual Competition at 90cm level.

The team classes can take up to 20 teams of four horse and rider combination and will be run under British Showjumping rules.

The Individual Competitions are only open to competitors who have competed in the Team Competitions. The Individual Competitions will be at 85cm and 95cm height.

The individual classes will see all competitors who gain a clear round jump against the clock to produce the individual winner.

Equerry Horse Feed, rugs and saddlecloths as well as rosettes will be awarded to the prize winners in what looks set to be a great addition to the competition at Bolesworth International.

Said Show President, Nina Barbour: “We are delighted to be hosting the Equerry British Riding Clubs competition at Bolesworth International and look forward to members from across the region taking part in both the team and individual classes.”

Added Edward Lea of Equerry Horse Feeds: “This new addition is just fantastic and give riding club members the opportunity to compete in front of Bolesworth Castle which provides a stunning and prestigious backdrop.”

Also taking place on Saturday, June 16 is the glamorous event of Ladies Day, CSI 4* Showjumping and CSI 2* Showjumping Grand Prix. In the evening there will be the exciting Bentley Ride & Drive competition. Not to be missed evening entertainment from Rick Parfitt Jnr and the RPJ Band is also taking place on Saturday. With so much going on it is the perfect opportunity to have an enjoyable day out with your friends.

Day and evening hospitality tables are available from £85+VAT per person for tables of six or eight. Including access to our luxury ringside marquee, with high end dining included from renowned London caterers Absolute Taste. For more information and to book Hospitality packages, contact melanie@bolesworth.com

General admission tickets can be bought online at www.bolesworthinternational.com

Carriage Driving Stallion Paddy is a Golden Oldie!

AT 23-years-old carriage driving stallion, Paddy had started to look his age and owner, Sam Kelly was looking at retiring her much loved liver chestnut.

Known as Stapleford Enchantment in the show ring, Sam has owned Paddy since he was a weaned foal, and driving is very much a family affair with everyone enjoying the sport.

Last year Paddy had started to lose topline and general condition and wanting to do the best for her beloved partner, Sam looked around at what feeds would be suitable to help.

Sam started to feed Paddy, Equerry Conditioning Mash last year and he never looked back, with the family deciding to put his retirement on hold, he is now looking so well.

Said Sam: “We are delighted with the results, Paddy looks fantastic and is worked five times a week which is why it is essential he gets the correct feed and his energy levels are sufficient.

“He is such a versatile horse and Paddy has competed in in hand, driven and ridden showing, horse driving trials and ridden dressage. He has even taken our daughter to her wedding.

“As a family we just really enjoy driving. I take on the role of backstepper as well as groom and lorry driver.  I’m a bit of a jack of all trades and we won five out of five competitions this season and are very much looking forward to the Indoor Driving Championships at Keysoe which we have qualified for.

“We have been delighted with Equerry Conditioning Mash, it has definitely restored Paddy’s topline and worked wonders for his general health and wellbeing, and his coat now really shines.

“Being an older horse, Paddy prefers to eat mash and I think the fact that he is still enjoying his work and looking well at 23-years of age means that the feed is supporting him to stay in tip top shape.”

Equerry Conditioning Mash is a quick-soaking mash for horses that need to gain weight and condition.

It is low in sugar and starch and is ‘Non-Heating’ and includes highly digestible fibre sources including sugar beet. It has a good level of protein for muscle development and topline and the high oil level and linseed in the feed helps promote condition and a shiny coat.

The mash also includes a high level of yeast for a healthy digestive system and has added vitamins and minerals including magnesium.

Rebecca and Indie – A Match Made in Heaven

Indie & Rebecca Jago

Rebecca Jago and her dun Appaloosa X Warmblood mare ‘Rowesbrook Indiana’ are a match made in heaven competing in everything from Riding Club competitions to showing, dressage to music and British Eventing.

Fed on Equerry Conditioning Mash, Indie as she is known at home looks a picture of health all year round and has been fed on Equerry for more than 12 months.

Indie is a 10-year-old, 15.1hh homebred mare out of another of Rebecca’s homebred mare’s Sunspot Tia Maria. Rebecca has always had a passion for horses since a young age and alongside her interest in breeding horses she trained as a riding instructor.

However, Rebecca went off to University to become a teacher and now juggles being a full-time classroom teacher with taking part in as many competitions as she can fit in.

Rebecca competes in all disciplines from Riding Club Championships to The Royal International Horse Show and British Eventing, with Equerry Conditioning Mash keeping Indie performing at and looking her best.

As a duo their most memorable accomplishment was competing and qualifying in the Dressage to Music held at Bury Farm in 2016, they rode alongside another dun horse with a routine entirely to Disney Music which both Rebecca and Indie thoroughly enjoyed.

Said Rebecca: “Indie is so willing and tries her hardest at everything, she is just a superstar and we have so much fun together.”

Before feeding Equerry Conditioning Mash, Indie was fed straights such as barley and has since seen a huge difference. The Equerry Conditioning Mash enables Indie to stay in excellent condition whilst having enough fuel to keep her competing.

Said Rebecca: “I swear by Equerry Conditioning Mash! It has helped Indie not only look great but perform her best throughout demanding times.

“I am an absolute convert and Indie loves it, she is in great condition all year round.”

The Equerry Conditioning Mash is a quick-soaking mash for horses that need to gain weight and condition. It is low in sugar and starch and is ‘Non-Heating’ and includes highly digestible fibre sources including sugar beet. It has a good level of protein for muscle development and topline and the high oil level and linseed in the feed helps promote condition and a shiny coat. The mash also includes a high level of yeast for a healthy digestive system and has added vitamins and minerals including magnesium.

Equerry Minty Treats Now in 20kg Bag

Equerry Minty Treats make the perfect reward for your horse or pony and have a lovely spearmint flavour.

And these delicious healthy treats now come in a new 20kg size – ideal for larger yards or sharing!

A healthy treat option, Minty Treats are fibre-based nuggets, low in sugar and are ‘Non-Heating’ and cereal-grain-free so they won’t cause any problems or ‘fizz’.

They can be fed by hand, in a treat ball or added to feed to tempt fussy feeders.

Equerry Minty Treats are great for when your horse deserves a little reward.

Along with the launch of the new 20kg size Equerry is also running a special promotion throughout February and March.

Buy four bags of any Equerry product at your local store and get one bag of Equerry Minty Treats absolutely free.

The Equerry horse feed range includes Equerry High Fibre Cubes, Equerry Cool Mix, Equerry Horse & Pony Mix, Equerry Horse & Pony Cubes, Equerry Conditioning Mash, Equerry Conditioning Cubes and Equerry Veteran Mix.

Equerry Minty Treats 20kg are £11.50.

To find out more about the Equerry range of horse feeds visit www.equerryhorsefeeds.com or telephone 01845 565640.

Jake Hits Triumphant Form

Jake Saywell showcased the best of young British showjumping talent when he claimed a thrilling victory in the Liverpool International Horse Show Under-25s Grand Prix.

The class, sponsored by Equerry Horse Feeds, saw a high-class entry assembled, including the likes of Jake, Robert Murphy, Jessica Mendoza – Great Britain reserve rider at the 2016 Rio Olympics – highly-rated Harry Charles and his sister Sienna.

Eleven combinations from 23 starters made the jump-off, and it was Harry Charles who set the pace from an early draw when he clocked 31.15 seconds with Victor.

That time looked like it might be quick enough, but Robert Murphy and Del Fuego had other ideas, with Robert punching the air in celebration after going more than a second quicker.

But the stage was then set for Jake and Havinia van de Roshoeve, and they did not disappoint, clipping 33 hundredths of a second off the leader’s time to land a £2,000 top prize.

“The calibre of riders we have coming up in Great Britain is fantastic,” Jake said. “It’s a real credit to us as a country, and tonight it made for a very good class.

“The jump-off was fast. The first round wasn’t an easy track, so 11 going through said everything about the standard.

“Harry looked fast. I know my mare very well – she is very careful – so I knew I could be there or thereabouts, and then I heard Rob’s time, which was going some again.

“My horse is a class horse, a very careful jumper. The way she is jumping, and aong with some other horses I have, who knows for 2018.

“Liverpool is a fantastic show. To ride in an arena like that is really setting up the young riders for a big career. To come into the Echo Arena is great.”

Christmas Fun with Julie Templeton

Christmas fun with Julie Templeton

When do you hang your Christmas decorations?

December 1.

When do you do your Christmas shopping?

Fiona does most and normally starts in the summer but I do mine on Christmas Eve.

Do you do anything on Christmas Eve or have any family traditions?

Just sit down to a big meal and play games afterwards, although this normally gets way too competitive.

What is your favourite part of Christmas dinner?

Pigs in blankets.

Do you have any Christmas traditions?

We each take it in turn to open one present, that’s probably why it takes us all day!

Is there anything you have asked for this Christmas?

Rotisserie attachment for my BBQ.

How do you spend Christmas Day?

Do the yard really early then come in and cook a big breakfast with champagne for everyone. Start opening presents then family get nibbles ready for lunch while we skip out. We spend the afternoon opening presents and then finish off the yard before coming in to start cooking Christmas dinner. After dinner we normally just chill out in front of the television and the fire.

Do you spend Christmas Day with family, how many people sit round the table?

Yes, there are normally about 10 of us.

Do your pets get Christmas presents?

Yes, probably more than me.

How will you spend New Year’s Eve?

At home with the dogs, we give the staff Christmas and New Year off, so it means we are on yard duties.

What is your New Year’s Resolution?

Live every day to the full.

 

Quick Fire Questions

Real or Fake Christmas tree? Real.

Christmas Pudding or another dessert? Christmas pudding.

Favourite Christmas Carol? Good King Wenceslas.

Tinsel or no tinsel? Tinsel.

What part did you play in the school nativity? A wise man.

If you could kiss anyone under the mistletoe, who would it be? Anyone who offered to do my share of the mucking out.

Favourite Christmas film? Scrooge.

Are you on the naughty or the nice list? Both.

Turkey, goose or vegetarian option? Turkey.

 

Christmas with Bonnie Fishburn

Christmas fun with Bonnie Fishburn

When do you hang your Christmas decorations?  About a week before Christmas.

When do you do your Christmas shopping? I pick things up all year as I see them and then have a mad panic a week or so before when I still need to find something for someone.

Do you do anything on Christmas Eve or have any family traditions? I try and meet up with friends for a few drinks.

What is your favourite part of Christmas dinner? I love food so all of it! But I particularly like sprouts with chestnuts, bread sauce and pigs in blankets.

Do you have any Christmas traditions? Eggs Royale for breakfast.

Is there anything you have asked for this Christmas? An indoor arena, horse walker and a gallop. If I got any of these I would be delighted but failing that a soup recipe book and a nice casual coat.

What is your horsey routine on Christmas Day? I get up early and ride a few before heading back to the house for a yummy breakfast and to open presents. Then we head to a lunch with family. Back to do the horses in the evening and then chill out in front of the television.

How do you spend Christmas day? With my mum and her husband’s family. They take it in turns to host the day.

Do you spend Christmas Day with family, how many people sit round the table? Yes, there are usually around 15 to 20 of us.

Do you treat yourself to a Christmas jumper, if yes then what design is on your jumper this year? I got one last year for the first time and it had an elf on it.

Do you go for a Christmas hack? Not really.

What do you do on Boxing Day? Go to the local hunt meet.

 Do your pets get Christmas presents? Of course, and they love opening them.

How will you spend New Year’s Eve? We are hosting a Murder Mystery dinner party this year.

What is your New Year’s Resolution? To get back eventing having missed half of last season having had baby Harriet.

Quick Fire Questions

Real or Fake Christmas tree? Real.

Christmas Pudding or another dessert? Another dessert.

Favourite Christmas Carol? Good King Wenceslas.

Colour co-ordinated baubles or not? Colour co-ordinated.

Tinsel or no tinsel? No tinsel.

What part did you play in the school nativity? An Angel.

If you could kiss anyone under the mistletoe, who would it be? My husband of course but if he’s not available Elvis (Luke Pasqualino) out of Our Girl would do or Scott Eastwood.

Favourite Christmas film? Let It Snow or Love Actually, it’s a tough one!

Are you on the naughty or the nice list? NICE!

Turkey, goose or vegetarian option? Turkey.

Christmas with Alanna Clarke

Alanna Clarker Christmas graphic

When do you hang your Christmas decorations?

About a week before Christmas normally. My Gran comes to stay and we do them together.

When do you do your Christmas shopping?

Everything gets done in a panic a week before Christmas.

Do you do anything on Christmas Eve or have any family traditions?

We leave out Reindeer food and Father Christmas always has a Brandy left out for him, apparently its not that well known but that’s his favourite my Mum says!

What is your favourite part of Christmas dinner?

All of it!  Except the Brussel sprouts, yuk! It’s the only time of year I’m made to eat them and the worst thing about Christmas!

Do you have any Christmas traditions?

Opening presents before breakfast, I can never wait.

What is your horse expecting this Christmas?

Katrina my horse will be having some Equerry Minty Treats for Christmas. She never ate treats before we found these, and she can’t get enough of them.

Is there anything you have asked for this Christmas?

I would love a beautiful orange browband to match my orange matching set.

What is your horsey routine on Christmas Day?

It’s a normal day for the horses really, I think they like routine.

How do you spend Christmas Day?

Presents, breakfast, go to the yard, home to help cook dinner and watch some television, then back to settle the horses for the night and spend time with family.

Do you spend Christmas Day with family, how many people sit round the table?

Yes, I normally spend Christmas at home with Mum and Gran comes to stay, then I go to Dad’s for New Year.

Do you treat yourself to a Christmas jumper?

Haha, I don’t but last year Gran got me one with a cat wearing a Christmas hat!

 

Do you go for a Christmas hack?

No, we all have a day off.

What do you do on Boxing Day?

I like to check out if the Bloodhounds are out and go along.

Do your pets get Christmas presents?

No, they get spoilt all the time.

How will you spend New Year’s Eve?

I will be having a second Christmas with my Dad.

What is your New Year’s Resolution?

To get a six pack, I really need to work on my core.

Quick Fire Questions

Real or Fake Christmas tree? Fake.

Christmas Pudding or another dessert? Chocolate cake.

Favourite Christmas Carol? Ding Dong Merrily on High.

Colour Coordinated baubles or not? Whatever takes my fancy.

Tinsel or no tinsel? Tinsel.

What part did you play in the school nativity? The Angel Gabriel.

If you could kiss anyone under the mistletoe, who would it be? Jensen Ackles or Matthew Daddario.

Favourite Christmas film? Home Alone.

Are you on the naughty or the nice list? Ooohhhh I don’t know!

Turkey, goose or vegetarian option? Turkey!

Training for Leg Yield

When training on the flat, suppleness is a key element which should be carefully attended to and developed.  A useful exercise which can significantly help to improve suppleness is leg yield. It is the first lateral exercise that is introduced to a horse and involves working on two tracks.

Leg yield is the most basic of lateral movements and encourages looseness and flexibility across the whole of the horse’s body whilst ensuring that the rider uses the correct aids and leg positioning to influence the horse.

During leg yield, the horse steps sideways and forwards at the same time. This means that the inside hind leg steps into the tracks of the opposite front leg. The inside legs step in front of and across the outside feet and the steps should be equal and in positive forward momentum.

When training for leg yield it is important that the horse moves off the leg and learns the aid to step sideways. It is crucial that the rider positions the horse correctly to set up the leg yield. To start with turn the horse down the centre or quarter line and be sure to ride a few straight steps before turning your horses shoulders onto a diagonal line in the direction that you wish to travel.

The half halt should then be used to make the horse’s shoulders wait and the outside leg can be applied for support. Simultaneously, the inside leg should be applied slightly further back, just behind the girth and should be used to ask the horse to step sideways. The rider should sit with a heavier inside seat bone, which the horse should learn to move away from. To clarify, the inside leg drives the sideways motion whilst the outside leg ‘guards’ and encourages forwardness.

When leg-yielding, the horse should be straight through the body and give a slight flexion to the inside at the poll, which is encouraged by a gentle inside rein.

To finish the leg yield, the horse should be straightened, so that his hind legs and forelegs use the same track. It is important that the movement is started and finished properly so that the horse learns to be obedient and not fall sideways until he reaches the track for support.

There are different forms of leg yield which can be utilised as training progresses. These include leg yield on a circle, off a diagonal line and from line to line. Leg yield can be performed in walk, trot and canter, but should be introduced in walk to establish the correct positioning and teach the horse to accept the aids.

Leg yield is very useful for developing lateral suppleness, which will improve the horse’s way of going as well as teaching the rider to ride lateral movements correctly. When the leg yield is established, other lateral work can be introduced such as shoulder in which should be smooth as the horse has learnt to accept the aids involved.